Native american ethnobotany database. Your source for reliable herbal medicine information. Native Amer...

Navajo Drug, Gland Medicine detail... (Elmore, Francis H., 1944,

Ethnobotanical Database (Duke, 2008) and rece nt . articles indexed on Pubmed, ... (Farsnworth, 2003; Native American Ethnobotany . Database, 2012), there is no doubt about its .Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous (native) plants. Plants provide food, medicine, shelter, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, gums, soaps, waxes, latex, tannins, and even contribute to the air we breathe. Many native peoples also use plants in ceremonial or spiritual rituals.Extended family and popular medicine on St. Helena Island, S.C.: adaptations to marginality (1974) Daniel Ellis Moerman (born 1941) is an American medical anthropologist and ethnobotanist, and an emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. [2] He is known for his work relating to Native American ethnobotany and ...109 native North American peoples from indigenous peoples of Mexico, Central and South America, 110 and many other places as well. The one significant Native American use of a consciousness ...12 uses matching query. Search results limited to 1,000 records. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for nose troubles. Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, page 82. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for throat troubles.Native American Ethnobotany A Database from the University of Michigan A database of plants used as drugs, foods, dyes, fibers, and more, by native Peoples of …Native American Ethnobotany Database A Database of foods, drugs, dyes and fibers of Native American Peoples that are derived from plants. Each entry contains how the item is used, a reference to the literature, and for most entries a link to the USDA Plants datbase. USDA Plants Database Use the "Culturally Significant category on the main page.Native American Ethnobotany Database A Database of foods, drugs, dyes and fibers of Native American Peoples that are derived from plants. Each entry contains how the item is used, a reference to the literature, and for most entries a link to the USDA Plants datbase. USDA Plants Database Use the "Culturally Significant category on the main page.Native American Ethnobotany: A database of plants used as drugs, foods, dyes, fibers, and more, by native Peoples of North America. The database now contains 44,691 items. This version added foods, drugs, dyes, fibers and other uses of plants (a total of over 44,000 items).Documented uses. 72 uses documented. Abnaki Food, Fruit detail... (Rousseau, Jacques, 1947, Ethnobotanique Abenakise, Archives de Folklore 11:145-182, pages 169) Alaska Native Food, Fruit detail... (Heller, Christine A., 1953, Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska, University of Alaska, pages 93) Alaska Native Food, Preserves detail...165 uses documented. Abnaki Food, Fruit detail... (Rousseau, Jacques, 1947, Ethnobotanique Abenakise, Archives de Folklore 11:145-182, pages 168) Algonquin, Quebec Drug, Cough Medicine detail... (Black, Meredith Jean, 1980, Algonquin Ethnobotany: An Interpretation of Aboriginal Adaptation in South Western Quebec, Ottawa.In addition, we are building an extensive Prairie Ethnobotany Database by researching, compiling, and synthesizing data from existing ethnobotanical information on Native Medicinal Plants of Kansas, the Great Plains and adjacent areas. The database now contains nearly 1,500 species, about two-thirds of which occur in Kansas.Your source for reliable herbal medicine information. Native American Ethnobotany. Native American Ethnobotany. Hardcover, 927 pp., ISBN 0-88192-453-9. Available from ABC Book Catalog #B355. $79.95.p#. American Botanical Council, 6200 Manor Rd, Austin, TX 78723 Phone: 512-926-4900 | Fax: 512-926-2345 | Email: [email protected] the Native American Ethnobotany Database, there are 33 matches (Rubus chamaemorus, n.d.). The fruit is eaten fresh or stored for winter, and tea of roots and stems can be used medicinally for reproductive health. I would like to find more research about this important plant.Ethnobotany is the study of how people of a particular culture and region make use of indigenous (native) plants. Plants provide food, medicine, shelter, dyes, fibers, oils, resins, gums, soaps, waxes, latex, tannins, and even contribute to the air we breathe. Many native peoples also use plants in ceremonial or spiritual rituals.Use documented by: Swank, George R., 1932, The Ethnobotany of the Acoma and Laguna Indians, University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis, page 53. View all documented uses for Medicago sativa L. Scientific name: Medicago sativa L. USDA symbol: MESAS ( View details at USDA PLANTS site) Common names: Alfalfa. Family: Fabaceae.Developed by the University of New Mexico, this database contains bibliographic information and abstracts of health-related articles, reports, surveys, and other resource documents pertaining to the health and health care of Indigenous Peoples. Contains information on plant-based food, medicines, dyes, and textiles used by Indigenous peoples.Smith, Huron H., 1932, Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee 4:327-525, page 421 View all documented uses for Pinus strobus L. Scientific name: Pinus strobus L.Ethnobotany. Many Pacific Northwest tribes (Alaska Native, Gitksan, Okanagan-Colville, and others) have eaten the rootstocks as a vegetable (boiled or roasted). A decoction of root has been taken to treat joint pain, heart disease, tuberculosis, lung hemorrhage, skin sores, and rheumatism. Ground seeds have been used to make bread and porridge.Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1971, The Ethnobotany of the Coast Salish Indians of Vancouver Island, I and II, Economic Botany 25(1):63-104, 335-339, page 69 View all documented uses for Polypodium virginianum L. ... Native …Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium. Fireweed. USDA CHANA2. Bella Coola Drug, Dermatological Aid. Poultice of roasted and mashed roots applied to boils. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 207. Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium.Visit California will launch a new online platform promoting travel with the state's 109 federally recognized Native American tribes in 2023. This week, Visit California (the state’s tourism marketing arm) revealed plans to launch a new onl...Documented uses. 72 uses documented. Abnaki Food, Fruit detail... (Rousseau, Jacques, 1947, Ethnobotanique Abenakise, Archives de Folklore 11:145-182, pages 169) Alaska Native Food, Fruit detail... (Heller, Christine A., 1953, Edible and Poisonous Plants of Alaska, University of Alaska, pages 93) Alaska Native Food, Preserves detail...Native American Ethnobotany Database. A Database of Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers of Native American Peoples, Derived from Plants. Tropical Plant Database. Created by Dr. Leslie Taylor this website provides free access to well-researched and referenced monographs on healing plants from the rain forest and nearby areas. Although the site offers ...Read 14 reviews from the world’s largest community for readers. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medici…Infusion of fresh or dried plant taken for nausea. Hart, Jeffrey A., 1981, The Ethnobotany of the Northern Cheyenne Indians of Montana, Journal of Ethnopharmacology 4:1-55, page 17. Achillea millefolium L. Common Yarrow. USDA ACMIM2. Cheyenne Drug, Cold Remedy. Infusion of fresh or dried plant taken for colds.Database information is seldom provided in reference list entries. The reference provides readers with the details they will need to perform a search themselves if they want to read the work—in most cases, writers do not need to explain the path they personally used. Think of it this way: When you buy a book at a bookstore or order a copy off ...Navajo Drug, Gland Medicine detail... (Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, pages 50) Paiute Drug, Analgesic detail... (Train, Percy, James R. Henrichs and W. Andrew Archer, 1941, Medicinal Uses of Plants by Indian Tribes of Nevada, Washington DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, pages 142)Navajo Drug, Gland Medicine detail... (Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, pages 50) Paiute Drug, Analgesic detail... (Train, Percy, James R. Henrichs and W. Andrew Archer, 1941, Medicinal Uses of Plants by Indian Tribes of Nevada, Washington DC. U.S. Department of Agriculture, pages 142)Haisla and Hanaksiala Fiber, Snow Gear detail... (Compton, Brian Douglas, 1993, Upper North Wakashan and Southern Tsimshian Ethnobotany: The Knowledge and Usage of Plants..., Ph.D. Dissertation, University of British Columbia, pages 173) Hanaksiala Drug, Gastrointestinal Aid detail...Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1971, The Ethnobotany of the Coast Salish Indians of Vancouver Island, I and II, Economic Botany 25(1):63-104, 335-339, page 69 View all documented uses for Polypodium virginianum L. ... Native …Jun 8, 2021 ... Moerman, Native American ethnobotany: A database of foods, drugs, dyes and fibers of Native American peoples, derived from plants (2020).Native American Ethnobotany. Hardcover – August 15, 1998. An extraordinary compilation of the plants used by North American native peoples for medicine, food, fiber, dye, and a host of other things. Anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman has devoted 25 years to the task of gathering together the accumulated ethnobotanical knowledge on more than ...Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium. Fireweed. USDA CHANA2. Bella Coola Drug, Dermatological Aid. Poultice of roasted and mashed roots applied to boils. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 207. Chamerion angustifolium ssp. angustifolium.12 uses matching query. Search results limited to 1,000 records. Dried and pulverized plant used as a snuff for nose troubles. Elmore, Francis H., 1944, Ethnobotany of the Navajo, Sante Fe, NM. School of American Research, page 82. Dried and pulverized plant used as a …Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Bella Coola Indians of British Columbia, Syesis 6:193-220, page 197. Abies amabilis (Dougl. ex Loud.) Dougl. ex Forbes. Pacific Silver Fir. USDA ABAM. Bella Coola Drug, Throat Aid. Liquid pitch mixed with mountain goat tallow and taken for sore throat. Turner, Nancy J., 1973, The Ethnobotany of the ...Ilex opaca, also known as American holly, is a native evergreen tree that grows in the eastern and central United States. It has glossy, spiny leaves and bright red berries that attract birds and wildlife. It can grow in various soils and climates, and is often used as an ornamental plant or a Christmas decoration. Learn more about its characteristics, uses, and conservation status …Mohegan Drug, Toothache Remedy detail... (Tantaquidgeon, Gladys, 1928, Mohegan Medicinal Practices, Weather-Lore and Superstitions, SI-BAE Annual Report #43: 264-270, pages 266) Ojibwa Drug, Diuretic detail... (Smith, Huron H., 1932, Ethnobotany of the Ojibwe Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of Milwaukee 4:327-525, pages 391) Ojibwa Food ...Other Databases of Interest. Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. U. Maryland. Moerman Database - U. Michigan. American Indian Ethnobotany Database. Plants and ..."African-American" is a divisive misnomer for native-born Black Americans. STOP using that term. Now Vice-President-elect Sen. Kamala Harris has brought an issue to the fore, as journalists resist using a certain term to ‘describe’ her. I a...Calocedrus decurrens (Torr.) Florin. Incense Cedar. USDA CADE27. Cahuilla Fiber, Building Material. Bark used to make conical shaped houses for temporary use while camped to gather and process acorns. Bean, Lowell John and Katherine Siva Saubel, 1972, Temalpakh (From the Earth); Cahuilla Indian Knowledge and Usage of Plants, Banning, CA.Diegueno Drug, Dermatological Aid. Decoction of fresh or dried, entire plant used as a wash for wounds. Hinton, Leanne, 1975, Notes on La Huerta Diegueno Ethnobotany, Journal of California Anthropology 2:214-222, page 219. Ericameria brachylepis (Gray) Hall. Chaparral Heathgoldenrod.Distribution: This plant grows from British Columbia to California and east to northwestern Montana. This plant grows at the coast and on both sides of the Cascade crest in Washington. Height: This plant grows up to 24 to 48 inches (60 to 120 cm) in height. Flowers: Large, showy bright orange flowers are produced with deep-red or purple spots ...Canada Department of Mines, page 118. Oxalis corniculata L. Creeping Woodsorrel. USDA OXCO. Menominee Dye, Yellow. Boiled whole plant used as a yellow dye. Smith, Huron H., 1923, Ethnobotany of the Menomini Indians, Bulletin of the Public Museum of the City of Milwaukee 4:1-174, page 78. Oxalis drummondii Gray.School of American Research, page 73 Monarda punctata L. Spotted Beebalm USDA MOPUP2: Navajo, Ramah Drug, Analgesic Cold infusion taken and used as poultice for headache. Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 42Native American Ethnobotany Database. A Database of foods, drugs, dyes and fibers of Native American Peoples that are derived from plants. Each entry contains …Okanagan-Colville Other, Protection. Branches made into tea and used as washing water for one who was being jinxed by some bad person. Turner, Nancy J., R. Bouchard and Dorothy I.D. Kennedy, 1980, Ethnobotany of the Okanagan-Colville Indians of British Columbia and Washington, Victoria.Bocek, Barbara R., 1984, Ethnobotany of Costanoan Indians, California, Based on Collections by John P. Harrington, Economic Botany 38(2):240-255, page 9 Eschscholzia californica Cham. California Poppy USDA ESCAC: Costanoan Drug, Poison 'Plant avoided by pregnant or lactating women as smell may be poisonous.'Compound infusion of tubers given to babies that start suddenly during sleep. Compound decoction used as wash for child who does not talk or laugh. Roots steeped or eaten. Wyman, Leland C. and Stuart K. Harris, 1951, The Ethnobotany of the Kayenta Navaho, Albuquerque. The University of New Mexico Press, page 50.Many Native American groups collected blue cohosh for its anti-inflammatory properties. The Potawatomi and the Cherokee, for example, prescribed it during childbirth to reduce inflammation of the womb. The Fox, Menominee, Ojibwa, and Chippewa also used Blue Cohosh to suppress profuse menstruation. The statements above are sourced from:Apache, Chiricahua & Mescalero Food, Bread & Cake detail... (Castetter, Edward F. and M. E. Opler, 1936, Ethnobiological Studies in the American Southwest III. The Ethnobiology of the Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache, University of New Mexico Bulletin 4 (5):1-63, pages 48) Apache, Chiricahua & Mescalero Food, Sauce & Relish detail...Rosaceae Rubus fruticosus L. Shrubby Blackberry Micmac - Drug, Pediatric Aid Use documented by: Chandler, R. Frank, Lois Freeman and Shirley N. Hooper, 1979, Herbal Remedies of the Maritime Indians, Journal of Ethnopharmacology 1:49-68, page 61Native Plants Network, Propagation Protocol Database. Plants for a Future Database. Native American Ethnobotany, University of Michigan, Dearborn . Other Polystichum sp., native to the Pacific Northwest: Narrowleaf Sword Fern, P. imbricans is similar to Western Sword Fern and once was classified as a variety of P. munitum.(Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, pages 14) Nimpkish Fiber, Clothing detail... (Turner, Nancy Chapman and Marcus A. M. Bell, 1973, The Ethnobotany of the Southern Kwakiutl Indians of British Columbia, Economic Botany 27:257-310, pages 296)BC Studies 179 (Autumn 2013): 189-209. The authors consider the modern state of ethnobotany in British Columbia, which strives to integrate Western and non-Western knowledge in effective and respectful ways. Case studies explore plants role in education, the importance of Indigenous foods, and learning opportunities for plants in healthy diets.Common Snowberry. USDA SYALA. Blackfoot Other, Paint. Green twigs burned and smoke used to blacken newly made pipes. Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena. Montana Historical Society Press, page 59. Symphoricarpos albus (L.) …BRIT - Native American Ethnobotany Database NAEB Text Search Note: This Boolean text search is experimental and only Boolean operators "AND" and "OR" are supported. …Stevenson, Matilda Coxe, 1915, Ethnobotany of the Zuni Indians, SI-BAE Annual Report #30, page 55 ... Native American Tribe: Zuni Use category: DrugJun 16, 2023 ... Native American Ethnobotany. A database of foods, drugs, dyes and fibers of Native American Peoples, derived from plants. TRAMIL Library.In Native American Medicinal Plants, anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman describes the medicinal use of more than 2700 plants by 218 Native American tribes. Information--adapted from the same research used to create the monumental Native American Ethnobotany--includes 82 categories of medicinal uses, ranging from analgesics, contraceptives ...According to the Postsecondary National Policy Institute (PNPI), only 19% of 18–24-year-old Native Americans are enrolled in higher education. Compare that to the overall U.S. population — 41% of all 18–24-year-olds are enrolled in college ...Use documented by: Swank, George R., 1932, The Ethnobotany of the Acoma and Laguna Indians, University of New Mexico, M.A. Thesis, page 53. View all documented uses for Medicago sativa L. Scientific name: Medicago sativa L. USDA symbol: MESAS ( View details at USDA PLANTS site) Common names: Alfalfa. Family: Fabaceae.Other Databases of Interest. Medicinal and Poisonous Plants. U. Maryland. Moerman Database - U. Michigan. American Indian Ethnobotany Database. Plants and ...This database from the University of Michigan focus on the Foods, Drugs, Dyes and Fibers that Native American Peoples derived from Plants. Bishop Museum - Ethnobotany Database In this database you can search or just click on the name of a plant used by Native Hawaiian and learn its medicinal and non-medicinal uses.Database information is seldom provided in reference list entries. The reference provides readers with the details they will need to perform a search themselves if they want to read the work—in most cases, writers do not need to explain the path they personally used. Think of it this way: When you buy a book at a bookstore or order a copy off ...Schoolgirls in Britain being shown how to make a poultice, 1942. A poultice, also called a cataplasm, is a soft moist mass, often heated and medicated, that is spread on cloth and placed over the skin to treat an aching, inflamed, or painful part of the body. It can be used on wounds, such as cuts. 'Poultice' may also refer to a porous solid filled with a solvent used to remove …Our work focused on understanding the biology, ecology and ethnobotany of specific plant species. Ethnobotany Database Our work gathering and recording Native American Use of plants into a centralized database.Native American Ethnobotany: A database of plants used as drugs, foods, dyes, fibers, and more, by native Peoples of North America. The database now contains 44,691 items. This version added foods, drugs, dyes, fibers and other uses of plants (a total of over 44,000 items).Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 54 Verbesina encelioides ssp. exauriculata (Robins. & Greenm.) J.R. Coleman Golden Crownbeard USDA VEENE2: Navajo, Ramah Other, Ceremonial Items Used to make antelope prayer stick in Plumeway.... -30cm with partial shade (Culliney and Koebele 199:121–123). Hawaiian Native Plant Propagation Database. Native Plants Hawaii. © Bishop Museum, 2023.Sahnish (Arikara) Ethnobotany. Figure 1: A traditional Arikara burden basket with burden strap/tumpline made by SteštAhkáta of box elder (the white splints) and red-brown splints, which are made of the dried inner bark of peach leaf willow ( Salix amygdaloides ), to make the artistic pattern. These baskets were used for carrying ears of corn ...Contains primary and secondary documents such as artwork, speeches, petitions, diaries, journals, correspondence, early linguistic and ethnographic accounts, photographs, maps, rare books and newspapers, ranging from the 16th to the 20th century. more... Anthropology PlusVestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 54 Verbesina encelioides ssp. exauriculata (Robins. & Greenm.) J.R. Coleman Golden Crownbeard USDA VEENE2: Navajo, Ramah Other, Ceremonial Items Used to make antelope prayer stick in Plumeway.Combining Ethnobotany and Informatics to Discover Knowledge from Data. Publisher: Science Publishers, New Hampshire, USA. Editors: Rai M, Acharya D, Rios JL.Plants and herbs for Native American traditional teas, food, medicines; ethnobotany databases. Field ID photos with native info, vocabulary. Books and teacher resources. ... American Indian Ethnobotany Database--At the University of Michigan. Almost 4,000 plantnames, uses for food, medicine (the emphasis), fiber, and utility. Botannical names ...Welcome. Welcome to the Native Medicinal Plant Research Program at the University of Kansas. Our program focuses on native plants and ethnobotany of the Midwest, Great …The University of Michigan-Dearborn has a searchable database of Native American ethnobotany by scientific and common names that sorts plants by the tribes that use them. Kathleen McDonald, the executive director of the Mitchell Museum of the American Indian in Evanston, began the program by recognizing the indigenous groups of Illinois, whom ...University of the State of New York, pages 99) Iroquois Food, Bread & Cake detail... (Waugh, F. W., 1916, Iroquis Foods and Food Preparation, Ottawa. Canada Department of Mines, pages 123) Iroquois Food, Pie & Pudding detail... (Parker, Arthur Caswell, 1910, Iroquois Uses of Maize and Other Food Plants, Albany, NY.Using the online Native American Ethnobotany (NAEB) database, this study compiled a list of Asteraceae species and their ethnobotanical uses to identify tribes, genera, or species that are over-utilized as medicinal aids. It was hypothesized that the selection of North American Asteraceae species, based on reported uses by Indigenous peoples ...Vestal, Paul A., 1952, The Ethnobotany of the Ramah Navaho, Papers of the Peabody Museum of American Archaeology and Ethnology 40(4):1-94, page 54 Verbesina encelioides ssp. exauriculata (Robins. & Greenm.) J.R. Coleman Golden Crownbeard USDA VEENE2: Navajo, Ramah Other, Ceremonial Items Used to make antelope prayer stick in Plumeway.Hart, Jeffrey A., 1981, The Ethnobotany of the Northern Cheyenne Indians of Montana, Journal of Ethnopharmacology 4:1-55, page 6. Pinus ponderosa P.& C. Lawson. Ponderosa Pine. USDA PIPOP. Cheyenne Drug, Dermatological Aid. Pitch used to hold the hair in place. Hart, Jeff, 1992, Montana Native Plants and Early Peoples, Helena.Hawaiian Name, Species Name, Vernacular Name. ma'o (Abutilon), Abutilon incanum, hoary abutilon. koa, Acacia koa, none. koai'a, Acacia koaia, none.Summary: "Native American Ethnobotany is a comprehensive account of the plants used by Native American peoples for medicine, food, and other purposes. The author, anthropologist Daniel E. Moerman, has devoted more than 25 years to the compilation of the ethnobotanical knowledge slowly gathered over the course of many centuries and recorded in hundreds of …G AGIS Medical Plants Native American DataBase (MPNADB)--Similar to the U. Michigan database, but with the money and resources of government agencies behind it, the database is a more powerful searcher on the 3700 plants it contains. ... Turner, BTW is an anthro who thinks kinikinnik and tobacco are Native American Ethnobotany, Plant Knowledge ...Native American imagery is deeply rooted in the connection between nature and spirituality. From ancient petroglyphs to modern-day paintings, Native American artists have long used nature as a source of inspiration and symbolism.. "African-American" is a divisive misnomer Native American ethnobotany. The Cherokee This plant grows on both sides of the Cascades crest, and at the coast in Washington. Height: This plant grows 12 to 59 inches (30 to 150 cm) in height. Flowers: Three to 7 spikes are produced with the terminal spikes (1 to 3 in number) linear, long-stalked and containing many male flowers. The lower spikes (2 to 4 in number) are cylindrical ... Kiowa, and Oklahoma were among the Native Ameri Bella Coola Drug, Gastrointestinal Aid. Simple decoction, compound decoction or infusion of leaf taken and used externally for stomach pain. Smith, Harlan I., 1929, Materia Medica of the Bella Coola and Neighboring Tribes of British Columbia, National Museum of … Toxicodendron diversilobum (Torr. & Gray) Gr...

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